Photos, videos, overview and other associated materials for press under embargo until Friday, April 20, 2012 12:01 a.m. ET.

Overview of announcement

The era of the electric car is arriving, when we can depend on plentiful and cheap electricity to get us to where we want to go, rather than relying on increasingly expensive and scarce oil. However, big challenges remain as drivers consider a move away from gasoline as the primary source for automotive power.

Recognizing this, IBM Research started tackling this challenge in 2009 by pioneering a sustainable mobility project, called the Battery 500 Project. It’s goal was to solve one of the biggest barriers to widespread electric vehicle adoption: limited battery range.

Today’s electric cars can only travel about 150 miles on lithium-ion batteries, the same kind of technology that powers our computers and phones. For a car running on today’s lithium-ion batteries to match the range provided by a tank of gasoline, car manufacturers would need a very large battery which would weigh down the car and take up too much space. These batteries stand little chance of being cheap, light and small enough to power a typical family car to make their everyday use realistic.

To overcome this hurdle, IBM and its partners decided to completely rethink the power source for an electric car. They set out to develop lithium-air battery technology capable of powering a family-sized electric car for approximately 500 miles (800 km) on a single charge.

Instead of using heavy metal oxides, lithium-air batteries borrow oxygen from the air as the vehicle is being driven, creating an air-breathing battery.  This results in lighter batteries with high energy density that extend the car’s range from a single charge.

IBM researchers have successfully demonstrated in the lab the fundamental chemistry of the charge-and-recharge process for lithium-air batteries and, if this bold research project is successful, people could see it in cars between 2020 and 2030.

2 years ago
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DEMS: This machine, called a mass spectrometer is used to characterize oxygen consumption and oxygen evolution during battery discharge/recharge. 

DEMS: This machine, called a mass spectrometer is used to characterize oxygen consumption and oxygen evolution during battery discharge/recharge. 

2 years ago
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Contact Information

Ari Entin
IBM Media Relations
(408) 927-2272
aentin@us.ibm.com

 ibmresearchnews.blogspot.com

 @IBMResearch

 facebook.com/IBMResearch

2 years ago
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In 2009, IBM researchers set out to develop lithium-air battery technology capable of powering a family-sized electric car for approximately 500 miles (800 km) on a single charge.

Instead of using heavy metal oxides, lithium-air batteries borrow oxygen from the air as the vehicle is being driven, creating an air-breathing battery. This results in lighter batteries with high energy density that extend the car’s range from a single charge.

IBM researchers have successfully demonstrated in the lab the fundamental chemistry of the charge-and-recharge process for lithium-air batteries and, if this bold research project is successful, people could see it in cars between 2020 and 2030.

2 years ago
0 notes
Battery 500 Technical Illustration (Credit: IBM)
IBM started the Battery 500 project in 2009 to develop a new type of lithium-air battery technology that is expected to improve energy density tenfold, dramatically increasing the amount of energy these batteries can generate and store. Today, IBM researchers have successfully demonstrated the fundamental chemistry of the charge-and-recharge process for lithium-air batteries.ibm.co/battery500
More Battery 500 photos:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_research_zurich/sets/72157626235820482/with/6966378627/

Battery 500 Technical Illustration (Credit: IBM)

IBM started the Battery 500 project in 2009 to develop a new type of lithium-air battery technology that is expected to improve energy density tenfold, dramatically increasing the amount of energy these batteries can generate and store. Today, IBM researchers have successfully demonstrated the fundamental chemistry of the charge-and-recharge process for lithium-air batteries.
ibm.co/battery500

More Battery 500 photos:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_research_zurich/sets/72157626235820482/with/6966378627/

2 years ago
0 notes
Battery 500 Infographic (Credit: IBM)
Click to open the .jpg in a new window (click again to enlarge to full size)
More Battery 500 photos:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_research_zurich/sets/72157626235820482/with/6966378627/

Battery 500 Infographic (Credit: IBM)

Click to open the .jpg in a new window (click again to enlarge to full size)

More Battery 500 photos:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_research_zurich/sets/72157626235820482/with/6966378627/

2 years ago
0 notes